Did Ye Hear Mammy Died?

- Séamas O’Reilly

From an Observer columnist and Twitter sensation, the story of a boy growing up in a family bonded by loss, love and mockery, set against the backdrop of Northern Ireland in the 1990s.


Venue: VBA


Date / Time: 5:00pm, Friday, 22nd October


Admission: Free Event


Booking: www.eventbrite.com/e/168805057471


seamas portrait credit Ciara Burke.jpg

Did Ye Hear Mammy Died? is Séamas O’Reilly’s memoir of growing up as one of eleven children in rural Northern Ireland in the 1990s after the death of their mother when Séamas was five. He delves into his family - his pleasingly eccentric, reticent but deeply loving father; his rambunctious siblings, intent on enforcing a byzantine age-based hierarchy; and the numerous bewildering friends, relations and neighbours who blew in and out to ‘help’.

Séamas describes how his mother’s death changed his childhood relationships with everyone and everything, as knowledge of his tragic experience preceded him. He writes hilariously and tenderly of how his father, Joe, strove to give his children a happy home and a good education – building bookshelves in every room so as to avoid having to lecture them on the importance of academic achievement; videotaping and obsessively cataloguing more than 800 films so as not to have to take out a Blockbuster subscription; having the local nuns cook their Christmas turkey every year.

This unusual childhood took place in Northern Ireland at the end of the Troubles, on the Irish border that Brexit has made once more into a hotly contested political frontier. Séamas describes living on that boundary, including the time an IRA bomb blew out their windows when he was three.

Did Ye Hear Mammy Died? is the story of a boy growing up; a family bonded by loss, love and mockery; and their triumphs and disasters as they reached for their goal of some kind of normality.

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Séamas O’Reilly is a columnist for the Observer and writes about media and politics for the Irish TimesNew StatesmanGuts and VICE. He shot to a kind-of prominence with a range of online endeavours including ‘Remembering Ireland’, a parody of Irish nostalgia sites, which featured entirely invented moments from Irish history. In 2016, he posted a long Twitter thread about the effects Brexit would have on Northern Ireland, which led to his first political writing for the New Statesman. Later on that year, his exasperated reviews of the novels of erstwhile footballer and manager Steve Bruce led to his participation in events with Guardian Football Weekly and various others. His most recent viral sensation was a thread about the time he inadvertently found himself on ketamine while in a room serving drinks to his boss’s boss’s boss and the President of Ireland, Mary McAleese. Séamas lives in Hackney with his family.

WATERFORD WRITERS WEEKEND - OCT 22nd - 24th

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